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    need new clients

    If anybody is over-loaded with work, I can take on some new clients. I am in Denver CO, but can do all state returns not just Coloradao; individual as well as business.

    This would be very much appreciated.

    Thanks,
    nk

    #2
    Software

    What tax software do you use?

    Comment


      #3
      NK, your profile is empty. What is your experience with taxes?
      Dave, EA

      Comment


        #4
        Drake

        Lion: I use Drake.

        dsi: I have been doing taxes for over five years. Three years ago I started my own business, and I am still building the clientale. Most of my clients are 1040 clients, but I have quiet a few schedule Cs, partnerships and S-corps.
        As far as education goes: I passed the CPA and now I am just waiting for my license for state of CO. I try to read a lot on tax law and it's application so I can be "up-to-spead" in this profession.

        Thanks,
        nk

        Comment


          #5
          Maybe you should spend some time reading an English book

          or two, as well

          Comment


            #6
            oh, what do you know?

            My English is perfect. And by the way, I speak five more languages. And what do you know?

            Comment


              #7
              I know the following

              Originally posted by nkustura View Post
              Lion: I use Drake.

              dsi: I have been doing taxes for over five years. Three years ago I started my own business, and I am still building the clientale. Most of my clients are 1040 clients, but I have quiet a few schedule Cs, partnerships and S-corps.
              As far as education goes: I passed the CPA and now I am just waiting for my license for state of CO. I try to read a lot on tax law and it's application so I can be "up-to-spead" in this profession.

              Thanks,
              nk
              Clientele is not spelled "clientale"

              I know quite, as in "quite a few" is not "quiet" as in "you be quiet"

              I know speed, as in "up to speed" is not spelled "spead"

              What else would you like to know?

              Comment


                #8
                Can't Happen Overnight

                ...or at least you don't need for that to happen as you are tailor-made for 1040s, entities, etc. instead of the EIC crowd.

                Good suggestions:
                1) Go out of your way to provide "extra mile" considerations for your existing clients. Drop off paperwork for handicapped clients/relatives, make phone calls to their employers/payers, etc. Really CARE about them.
                2) If Denver has local area cable shows, try to appear on one, and take questions from the listening audience. If you don't know the answer, be candid but tell the listener you will research and find an answer if (s)he will leave contact information.
                3) Word-of-mouth. Word-of-mouth. Word-of-mouth.

                Bad suggestions:
                1) Yellow pages. They don't work anymore, and you will get phone calls from nosy competitors, charities, and curiosity-seekers and virtually no productive calls from prospective clients.
                2) Bargain-basement fees. You will attract clients that don't really want to pay for service, and when your business grows you will still be doing returns for rock-bottom prices. You can have competitive prices but not ridiculously low prices.
                3) Taking on unsavory clients. There are always people who haven't filed in 5 years and now want to get out of trouble. If you help them, get fees up front and turn them loose if they are not going to co-operate. Most of the time this crowd hasn't wanted to pay IRS or they wouldn't be in trouble anyway. Unless they really want to clean up their act, they won't want to pay you either.

                Long story short - preparers in your area are not going to send you clients unless they really can't handle them (for example, you might get some April 14th clients). Your success will not occur overnight -- if you observe the above you will have a growing, but solid, clientele.

                p.s. Multi-lingual talents do not contribute to your tax expertise. While most people admire this, potential clients may be somewhat uncomfortable with it.
                Last edited by Nashville; 02-28-2012, 10:30 AM.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Omission

                  Originally posted by JoshinNC View Post
                  Clientele is not spelled "clientale"

                  I know quite, as in "quite a few" is not "quiet" as in "you be quiet"

                  I know speed, as in "up to speed" is not spelled "spead"

                  What else would you like to know?
                  You omitted "it's" ......

                  FE

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Not trying to bust on ya

                    But, if you are going to be a self employed professional then every time you write something that someone else is going to read it will make an impression on others. You can know the Tax Code from A to Z, but if your grammar and/or spelling are off you may lose a client, so you should focus on tightening up that part of your skill set.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Oh No...

                      Oh No, it's yet another snippy "Less Filling/Tastes Great" tirade.

                      Chill out, for chrissakes

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I admit to not spelling it correctly here. However, I was not writing this to an IRS or a State Board, but for some much nicer people here. Also, when you speak and write in six different languages in one day, it is quite challenging. But you obviously donít know anything about that. And one more thing, eight years ago I didn't speak English at all, so I believe I still made it way furhter than you probably ever could.

                        Anyways, thanks for your suggestion.
                        Have a nice day!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          The good and the bad

                          Originally posted by Nashville View Post
                          ...or at least you don't need for that to happen as you are tailor-made for 1040s, entities, etc. instead of the EIC crowd.

                          Good suggestions:
                          1) Go out of your way to provide "extra mile" considerations for your existing clients. Drop off paperwork for handicapped clients/relatives, make phone calls to their employers/payers, etc. Really CARE about them.
                          2) If Denver has local area cable shows, try to appear on one, and take questions from the listening audience. If you don't know the answer, be candid but tell the listener you will research and find an answer if (s)he will leave contact information.
                          3) Word-of-mouth. Word-of-mouth. Word-of-mouth.

                          Bad suggestions:
                          1) Yellow pages. They don't work anymore, and you will get phone calls from nosy competitors, charities, and curiosity-seekers and virtually no productive calls from prospective clients.
                          2) Bargain-basement fees. You will attract clients that don't really want to pay for service, and when your business grows you will still be doing returns for rock-bottom prices. You can have competitive prices but not ridiculously low prices.
                          3) Taking on unsavory clients. There are always people who haven't filed in 5 years and now want to get out of trouble. If you help them, get fees up front and turn them loose if they are not going to co-operate. Most of the time this crowd hasn't wanted to pay IRS or they wouldn't be in trouble anyway. Unless they really want to clean up their act, they won't want to pay you either.

                          Long story short - preparers in your area are not going to send you clients unless they really can't handle them (for example, you might get some April 14th clients). Your success will not occur overnight -- if you observe the above you will have a growing, but solid, clientele.
                          Extremely wise advise, especially the "bad" suggestions.

                          I concur heartily on the "price-chasers" and the "problem" returns. Some tax problems I simply do not want to try to resolve. Yes, there are some dishonest people out there.

                          And #3 of the "good" is absolutely the best way to grow your practice.

                          FE

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thank you

                            Originally posted by Nashville View Post
                            ...or at least you don't need for that to happen as you are tailor-made for 1040s, entities, etc. instead of the EIC crowd.

                            Good suggestions:
                            1) Go out of your way to provide "extra mile" considerations for your existing clients. Drop off paperwork for handicapped clients/relatives, make phone calls to their employers/payers, etc. Really CARE about them.
                            2) If Denver has local area cable shows, try to appear on one, and take questions from the listening audience. If you don't know the answer, be candid but tell the listener you will research and find an answer if (s)he will leave contact information.
                            3) Word-of-mouth. Word-of-mouth. Word-of-mouth.

                            Bad suggestions:
                            1) Yellow pages. They don't work anymore, and you will get phone calls from nosy competitors, charities, and curiosity-seekers and virtually no productive calls from prospective clients.
                            2) Bargain-basement fees. You will attract clients that don't really want to pay for service, and when your business grows you will still be doing returns for rock-bottom prices. You can have competitive prices but not ridiculously low prices.
                            3) Taking on unsavory clients. There are always people who haven't filed in 5 years and now want to get out of trouble. If you help them, get fees up front and turn them loose if they are not going to co-operate. Most of the time this crowd hasn't wanted to pay IRS or they wouldn't be in trouble anyway. Unless they really want to clean up their act, they won't want to pay you either.

                            Long story short - preparers in your area are not going to send you clients unless they really can't handle them (for example, you might get some April 14th clients). Your success will not occur overnight -- if you observe the above you will have a growing, but solid, clientele.

                            p.s. Multi-lingual talents do not contribute to your tax expertise. While most people admire this, potential clients may be somewhat uncomfortable with it.
                            Thank you so much for these great advices. I really appreciate it.
                            nk

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Nice comeback!

                              Originally posted by JoshinNC View Post
                              But, if you are going to be a self employed professional then every time you write something that someone else is going to read it will make an impression on others. You can know the Tax Code from A to Z, but if your grammar and/or spelling are off you may lose a client, so you should focus on tightening up that part of your skill set.
                              Thanks,
                              nk

                              Comment

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